Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Protecting Your Cat From Attacks

This is the least upsetting of the photos of Rogue.

Protecting Your Cat From Attacks

I don't often share photos of injured cats on this blog, but this cat's situation makes an excellent point. It only takes a moment for a loose dog to injure your cat, possibly fatally. Little Rogue, shown above, was attacked by a dog in her building. Her family brought her to a local rescue group because they didn't have a regular veterinarian.

Rogue's owners didn't even seek medical treatment for her until a few days after she was attacked, likely due to cost. There is now a fundraiser to cover Rogue's medical bills going on through the rescue group that is trying to save her. (Follow the link if you'd like to help.) I'll warn you ahead of time: some of the photos of her injuries there are quite upsetting to see. The details of her condition are no less upsetting. Having loved a tortie for many years myself, it's especially distressing to see one in such condition.

Lessons From Rogue's Attack

What are the takeaways from little Rogue's case? How can you prevent the same thing from happening to your cat? Here are several that spring to mind:

  • Take your cat(s) to a veterinarian every so often and build a relationship there. Yes, it costs a little money. But in the event of injury or serious illness, that vet will already have your cat's medical history on file. And the staff there will be familiar with your cat, so the cat will be a little less stressed than he would be around complete strangers.
  • Have your cat microchipped. And keep your phone number and address updated with the microchip company.
  • Keep your cat(s) indoors most of the time. If you let your cat out, make sure it's either on a leash/harness, in an enclosed stroller, or supervised in a screened area or outdoor enclosure. No, scooping a litter box is not the most pleasant of tasks, but it beats all hell out of scooping up your cat's lifeless body after it's been killed...or helplessly watching your kitty get carried off by a hungry coyote.
  • If your cat escapes from the house and becomes lost, set kitty's litterbox outside the house, and keep a close eye on it. Your cat can smell it and will find his way home...where you can sweep him up into your loving arms and vow to keep him out of harm's way in the future! Most cats who get outside are hiding nearby. Check all the neighbors' sheds and garages to make sure your cat hasn't slipped into one and gotten locked in...especially if the weather is extremely hot or cold. Make sure the neighbors, as well as your local shelters and rescues, know you're looking for your cat, and check with them daily to see if anyone's brought him in.
  • If  the worst happens and your cat does get attacked, first concentrate on stopping the attack by any safe means necessary. Once your cat is out of immediate danger, stop any severe bleeding, swaddle him in a towel and get him to a veterinarian. If you can't afford the costs, there are Care Credit accounts, and if you don't qualify for one of those, there's always online fundraising. The main point is not to delay getting treatment for your injured cat. Poor Rogue has much worse injuries after a few days' infection than she would if her owners had sought veterinary care immediately after her attack.
I once knew a girl whose cat was pulled from her arms and killed right in front of her by a loose dog in her neighborhood. It's difficult to imagine, and impossible to overstate the dangers present for cats outdoors. There's a tale of someone's Savannah cat who got out and was roaming the neighborhood. While they were still looking for it, someone shot their cat dead, thinking it was an escaped wild cat from the zoo who was "stalking" the neighborhood children.


Again, my apologies for sharing such awful stories with you. But the fate that befell little Rogue does not have to happen to any other cat. Our cats depend on us for protection and safekeeping. Let them enjoy being cats, but remember to be vigilant! The world is a dangerous place for a kitty.


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